Embroidery Service
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UK Manufactures
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Embroidery Service
(*from just £2.50)

Free UK Delivery
(*on orders over £75)

UK Manufactures
since 1950

Speedy Delivery
on all Stocked Items

Relax and unwind as we apply spa and beauty therapy history!

Relax and unwind as we apply spa and beauty therapy history!

You’d be forgiven for thinking spa resorts and beauty therapy are both a relatively modern incarnation.

In truth these practices have existed for hundreds if not thousands of years.

The word ‘spa’ is believed to have derived from the Latin phrase ‘Salus per Aquam’ which means ‘health from water’.

Spa type therapies such as healing waters and hydrotherapy are said to predate even Roman and Greek times and it was men who tended to frequent them – how times have changed!

Even Greek philosopher Hippocrates extoled the virtues of aromatic bathing and scented massages as a way of relieving many ailments.

By the Elizabethan era, spa resorts were a firm favourite with the British for their restorative effects.

Although it’s been centuries in the making, today’s spa has also undergone something of an evolution over the last 30 years.

Once the mainstay of the wealthy, providing luxury pampering and extravaganza topped off with afternoon tea, the contemporary spa now has much more of a health and mindfulness focus, popular with all genders and demographics looking for occasional escapism.

Rolling back the years

Meanwhile the beauty therapy industry has also enjoyed a meteoric rise in popularity in recent years, offering a growing range of treatments and cosmetic techniques.

But let’s face it, grooming has been around in one form or another since the dawn of civilisation.

Many of the treatments and products we see today have their roots in the creams and oils used by Ancient Greeks and Egyptians – the latter also being credited with the invention of eyeliner which was used by both men and women.

Certain religious chapters in history deemed cosmetics to be considered corrupt and immoral, forcing women to stash away products and keep procedures well under wraps.

But it was the Hollywood glamour of the 1930s and 40s which really catapulted beauty therapy into the mainstream, as more and more women chose to break out from the shackles of disapproval to replicate movie star looks in terms of hair, make-up and fashion.

Now blessed with more self-care services and procedures than ever, from simple make-up and nails to facials, tanning, pedicures and specialist treatments such as skin peels and fillers, the high street beauty business is positively booming.

Women’s workwear – an evolution or a revolution?

As much as industries evolve, workwear does too – particularly for women.

Historical events and circumstances have had a big impact on workwear and uniforms throughout history, none more so than during the 20th century.

From both world wars, the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act of 1919 and 80’s power dressing that elevated the wearing of trouser suits in the workplace – which in turn filtered trousers into female-dominated professions such as nursing – all helped to liberalise workwear for women.

Even the pandemic has impacted workwear, whether it be face masks for many working in frontline roles or the fact WFH (Working from home) means you can rock a smarter top / PJ combo on Zoom calls!

Centuries old influences

But how has it changed for the spa and beauty sectors?

Spas draw on many cultural and geographical influences from the Belgian town of ‘Spa’ which became renowned for its healing springs in the 1300s to Japanese ryokan (hot spring resorts), Turkish hammams (Turkish baths) and Scandinavian saunas.

While spa uniforms were initially more clinical by design, often in white to reflect the medicinal nature of the industry, the contemporary versions often have subtle nuances driven by sector’s cultural influences such as mandarin collars.

The modern spa uniforms and luxury spa uniforms we see today are more visually appealing while exuding a calming aurora in line with the holistic nature of the industry.

Spa uniforms for women often reflect the company brand, aesthetic or setting of the spa environment itself.

Natural looking fabrics such as linen are popular in a range of earthy tones and hues such as the Harveys Workwear Linen Look Heather Top which can be matched with the Women’s Linen Look Heather Trouser

There’s also a much wider range of embellishments such as Asymetric Button Fastening Tunics or the Women’s Wrap Over Tunic – both available of a wide range of colours.

Many stylists and therapists in the hair and beauty industry choose to replicate the spa uniform aesthetic for its stylish and professional appearance – not just because it benefits the wearer, but it also creates a welcoming atmosphere and makes a lasting impression on the client.

When it comes to the beauty salon uniform, we offer a range of salon wear, tunics and trousers which not only offer style, affordability, quality and durability but have design innovation front of mind.

Sewn with style and substance

Whether it’s a beautician tunic, workwear for the salon or a spa uniforms, personalised embroidery is a key element.

Customising your workwear in the self-care and beauty industries has numerous benefits, from adding sophistication and establishing and building brand identity to enhancing the personalised client experience.

At Harveys we offer a bespoke embroidery service overseen by our highly skilled team of machinists who have many years of experience in bringing customer branding, designs and personalisation to life across a huge range of uniforms and workwear.

Why not browse our entire Beauty & Spa range and find out more about our expert embroidery service.

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